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World Watch: World Issues: No. 4: Pupil Book

By (author) Stephen Scoffham, By (author) Colin William Bridge, By (author) Terry Jewson

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normal price: R 270.95

Price: R 243.95


| book description |

World Watch 4 - World Issues focuses on changes in the earth's crust; water; local weather conditions; planning issues; jobs; transport problems, and conservation. Case studies allow students to compare and contrast the landscapes and settlements of England, Europe and the EU, and Africa. Themes: Planet Earth - A restless Earth Rivers - Water Weather - Local weather conditions Settlement - Planning issues Transport - Transport problems Work - Different jobs Environment - Conservation Places: UK - England Europe - Europe and the EU World - Africa

| product details |



Normally shipped | Available from overseas. Dispatched in aprox 4-8 weeks as local supplier is out of stock
Publisher | HarperCollins Publishers
Published date | 20 Feb 1996
Language |
Format | Paperback
Pages | 72
Dimensions | 276 x 219 x 5mm (L x W x H)
Weight | 210g
ISBN | 978-0-0031-5473-3
Readership Age |
BISAC | travel / general


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